Encourager’s Devotional Series – December Bible Study Answer Guide

Here are the answers to the Bible study that corresponds with the December Devotion for The Encourager’s Devotional Series.

Information

They saw ~ Look up Psalm 119:18 and write it out as you use it for a prayer prompt for your study time. ~ Open my eyes that I may see wonderful things in your law.

They rejoiced ~ Fill in the blanks for the following texts, looking for keys to maintaining joy in the Christian life.

John 16:24 – “…  ask and you will receive, and your  joy will be full.”

So, we can say that prayer is one key to maintaining joy. Now, go back to the previous chapter in John to look at some guidelines for prayer, to give some context to the promise, and to find another key to maintaining joy.

John 15:7-12

Verse 7 reveals what should motivate our prayers. “If you  remain in me and my words remain in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be given you.”

Verse 8 reveals the intended purpose of our requests. “This is to my Father’s glory, that you bear much fruit, showing yourselves to be my disciples.” 

Verses 9-13 give us yet another key to maintaining joy. “As the Father has loved me, so have I loved you. Now remain in my love. 10 If you keep my commands, you will remain in my love, just as I have obeyed my Father’s commands and remain in his love. 11 I have told you this so that my  joy may be in you and that your joy may be complete. 12 My command is this: Love each other as I have loved you.”

Notice that Jesus said we are to love one another as He loves us. The next verse hints as to how Jesus would ultimately show His love. Write verse 13 down. – Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.

1 John 1:4 – “We write this* to make our  joy complete.” * Read 1 John 1:1-3 to see what “this” was. Note that it was in sharing “this” message that John and his fellow Christians found joy. Summarize in your own words what was being shared in John’s writing.

(Answers may vary.) They had witnessed the life of Christ Jesus (the Word of life) and knew Him to be the key to eternal life. The sharing of this good news brings us into fellowship with God and with one another.

To recap these keys to finding/maintaining joy:

  • We experience joy when we pray, especially when our prayers are inspired by His word and motivated by a desire to bear fruit which brings glory to God.
  • We have joy when we remain in His love and demonstrate that love relationship through obedience to His word and modeling of His sacrificial service to others.
  • And finally, we maintain joy when we share what we know about Christ with others.

Psalm 16:11 also says God fills us with joy when we are in his presence, so we must explore how it is that we experience His presence.

They came ~ While we, as Christians, are assured that Christ is with us always, Scripture does indicate that there are means by which we can make ourselves more aware of His presence. We are also told to come to Him to experience the benefits of His presence more fully.  Continue reading

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Encourager’s Devotional Series – December Bible Study

This Bible study corresponds with the December Devotion for The Encourager’s Devotional Series.

Information

They saw ~ Look up Psalm 119:18 and write it out as you use it for a prayer prompt for your study time.

They rejoiced ~ Fill in the blanks for the following texts, looking for keys to maintaining joy in the Christian life.

John 16:24 – “…                                 and you will receive, and your                 will be                     .”

So, we can say that prayer is one key to maintaining joy. Now, go back to the previous chapter in John to look at some guidelines for prayer, to give some context to the promise, and to find another key to maintaining joy.

John 15:7-12

Verse 7 reveals what should motivate our prayers. “If you                      in           and my                      remain in                   , ask whatever you wish, and it will be given you.”

Verse 8 reveals the intended purpose of our requests. “This is to my Father’s                       , that you                    much                   , showing yourselves to be my disciples.” 

Verses 9-13 give us yet another key to maintaining joy. “As the Father has loved me, so have I loved you. Now remain in my love. 10 If you                       my                                  , you will remain in my love, just as I have obeyed my Father’s commands and remain in his love. 11 I have told you this so that my                    may be in you and that your                         may be                               . 12 My command is this: Love each other as I have loved you.”

Notice that Jesus said we are to love one another as He loves us. The next verse hints as to how Jesus would ultimately show His love. Write verse 13 down.

1 John 1:4 – “We                                     this* to make our                                                .”

* Read 1 John 1:1-3 to see what “this” was. Note that it was in sharing “this” message that John and his fellow Christians found joy. Summarize in your own words what was being shared in John’s writing.

To recap these keys to finding/maintaining joy:

  • We experience joy when we pray, especially when our prayers are inspired by His word and motivated by a desire to bear fruit which brings glory to God.
  • We have joy when we remain in His love and demonstrate that love relationship through obedience to His word and modeling of His sacrificial service to others.
  • And finally, we maintain joy when we share what we know about Christ with others.

Psalm 16:11 also says God fills us with joy when we are in his                              , so we must explore how it is that we experience His presence.

They came ~ While we, as Christians, are assured that Christ is with us always, Scripture does indicate that there are means by which we can make ourselves more aware of His presence. We are also told to come to Him to experience the benefits of His presence more fully.  Continue reading

Hope – by Anonymous

Patriarchal institution keepers – please, hear her story.

wmyn4wmyn

My education had mostly ended after eighth grade. So when I was sent off to college I was less than confident. I was informed not to worry about failing. I could go back home.This was no doubt said as a comfort, but to me it was a painful reminder of my inability. If I was to fail at college, I was to be sent to Alaska to find a husband. Not kidding.

This was repeatedly said to me. Followed by a laugh. Followed by a, “No really, I’m serious.” I would have to work as a hard as possible to maintain a C average. To my surprise, working as hard as possible produced A’s instead. Yet before I could receive my report card, I had been proposed to. I tentatively accepted on the advice of my Father.

I was hopeful to get out of it swiftly. Yet a series of…

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Wise Men Do More than Just Seek Him – December Encourager’s Devotion

Background image V. Gilbert and Arlisle F. Beers

Background image V. Gilbert and Arlisle F. Beers

Do you really have a revelation of who Jesus is, of the significance of the Christmas event? I emphasize the word “really” because it seems many claim to understand the message of the Gospel, and may even have taken first steps in response to it, but do not live in a way that shows true, convicting, life-changing comprehension. Those who do truly see the significance of the King of heaven coming to live among us, and eventually die for us, are driven to respond to that revelation.

Like the wise men (or magi) in the Christmas story, the response of a true believer will include more than just an initial understanding. The story of the magi is short, but as the picture accompanying this devotion highlights, the few short verses devoted to them are packed with emotion and action.

We’re going to take a look at all those action verbs in that short verse, but before we do, I invite you to stop and say a quick prayer with me: Lord, help me to see You today, to really experience Your presence, to really grasp the meaning of Your birth, to really see – as they saw.

From the story of the wise men, we first see that joy accompanies the revelation of Christ – they rejoiced. Many at this time of year toss around the word joy, but real evidence of the joy in a Christian’s life should be seen all year. The believer’s joy is “exceedingly great.” It is the type of joy which overflows into action. The wise men were so stirred by joy they were willing to take a long trip to see Jesus – they came.

We can not visit the Christ-child as the magi did, but many opportunities are given us to experience Christ’s presence. Worship services, communion, fellowship with His people, His word, prayer, and even acts of service (Mt 25:35-40) are all ways to connect with Christ. Those who really believe the Gospel will avail themselves of these opportunities as much as possible.

The magi took advantage of the opportunity to see Jesus. When you read the full text of Matthew 2 and consider what we know of transportation in those days, you’ll see this was not a convenient trip for them. They had to search to find the child. Indeed, they sacrificed of their time, their energy, and their material resources to get there.

The next action of the wise men is significant. It shows they really did comprehend the importance of Christ and His mission. After they made the effort to come into His presence, they were humbled by the experience to the extent that they fell down before Him they worshiped.

I started off by asking if you really get the message of the Gospel. The posture of the magi at this point in the story shows what it is like to fully understand the work of Christ. It is such a deep experience that it causes you to humble yourself, to fall on your face before Him and offer yourself to Him in worship. It is only when you get to this point with Christ that the next action has real meaning – they gave.

Many people give gifts, and for many reasons. We see this especially at Christmas. Some give out of obligation, some out of love, some out of guilt, some to show appreciation, some to impress others. Some motives are good, some not so good. Some gifts are good, some not so good. But even the best of gifts, given from the best of motives, will never compare with any gift – great or small, store-bought or handmade, an act of service or a word of encouragement – given in response to Christ. This is because any gift given in response to Christ actually helps to accomplish the mission of Christ.

Right after the magi leave, Mary and Joseph had to flee into Egypt to get away from King Herod. We know from the type of offering which was required of Mary and Joseph (Lk 2:24), and from their travel arrangements when they came to Bethlehem, they were not wealthy. This sudden relocation meant loss of income, as well as travel and resettling expenses. The gifts of the magi were surely a blessing which helped get them through that rough time.

The magi’s example of giving has inspired many to also give to Christ’s kingdom. As October’s devotion highlighted, giving to the kingdom will always have some kind of multiplying effect. In our first devotion in January, I used the text “He who refreshes others will himself be refreshed” (Prov 11:25b). The beginning of that Proverb is quoted in 2 Corinthians 9:6,7 when it speaks of sowing and reaping. Verse 24 of that same Proverb says when we scatter what we have, it increases. Remember, this has both material and spiritual connotations. We are promised material blessings when we give, but more important are the spiritual rewards. The Proverb (v. 30) reminds us that the real fruit of the righteous is the winning of souls. We must remember that all of our giving in response to Christ has eternal significance because it contributes to His purpose of reconciling sinners to God.

Let us be people who really understand the significance of Jesus birth, His death, and His resurrection. May we really rejoice in His message, with exceeding great joy! May we really see how important it is to be in His presence, taking advantage of the means He’s provided to do so. May we really worship and adore Him, all year long. And let us really open up our treasures and offer them to Him, and to others in His name.

Let us be people who really understand the significance of His birth … AND respond accordingly.

3 Reasons You Should Listen to the Fence-Sitters

The Lonely Fence-Sitter

So, here I sit … by nature the speak-up type … on the fence. How did that happen?

I have said for many years that I value the voices of the radicals because they challenge our assumptions and can help bring our thinking into balance. Radicals or extremists usually come to the forefront as reactionaries when the pendulum on an issue has swung too far in one direction. Yes, they may overstate their case, or swing the pendulum too far in the other direction, but without their voices we might never question how imbalanced things actually are (because that lack of balance has become the new status-quo).

Similarly, I have always had trouble respecting “fence-sitters.” At best, I’ve viewed them as apathetic. At worst, I’ve judged them as uncaring or cowardly. More recently, however, I have come to think it might actually be wise to seek out the fence-sitters and hear what they have to say when faced with a situation where extremists on both sides are screaming loudly. Here’s why:

  1. At the very least, if you are one of the radicals making noise, talking with the fence-sitters will help you see how your message is being received by those you are trying to persuade to join your cause. I mean, let’s face it, in battles of epic proportions the people on opposing sides aren’t typically trying to come together. They’re each trying to get their way, win the battle, shoot the other’s argument down. Okay, maybe that’s an overstatement, but seriously, if you’re not convincing a fence-sitter with your rhetoric, you’re certainly not going to convince the opposition.
  2. Talking with a fence-sitter might help you understand the valid points the opposition is making. Again, if you’re one of the radicals, you probably have trouble actually hearing the other side’s case because your senses are so inflamed against them.
  3. Don’t believe you could actually be that calloused against the other side? Appalled at the idea that you might be biased, or worse yet, not completely informed on the matter? Yeah, that’s another reason to speak with a fence-sitter. It’s a good opportunity for a heart check and, quite likely, fact-checking.

I suppose at this point, it might be good to mention the specific issues/incidents which have led me to think the fence-sitters might not be as uncaring as I once imagined. One is the racial tension in my own community (see prior posts here) and the other is a horrible situation in a local church which has spilled over into a Bible college I care about (see one article here, and one here … for the rest of the story, it won’t be hard to follow the rabbit trail to find details).

These circumstances have taught me the following about fence-sitting:

  • It is difficult to have your voice heard when you refuse to join one camp.
  • It is hard to convince people you care about them when you won’t agree with them completely.
  • If you want to hear the opinions and insights of the fence-sitter, you’ll probably have to seek them out because they shy away from speaking publicly as they don’t want to be labeled with either side. And, possibly, because they’ve seen how horribly each side has treated those who oppose them.
  • Just because someone does not grab the bullhorn, does not mean they don’t have some definite opinions.
  • When a fence-sitter is someone close to the situation, and they haven’t made complete enemies of either side, they probably have information you need to hear.
  • Fence-sitters often find themselves there because they care deeply about the people involved in the battle. If you want to gain an ally, spark up a conversation with them.

Encourager’s Devotional Series – November Bible Study Answer Guide

Here are the answers for the Bible study for the November Devotion “Giving Out of Our Poverty” in The Encourager’s Devotional Series.

Information

Read Acts 16:1-17:15, which tells of Paul and his team’s first missionary journey to Macedonia.

From Acts 16, list the troubles that Paul and his team experienced in Philippi:

  • They were harrassed by a girl who was possessed by a demon (vv. 16-18).
  • They were stripped and beaten (v. 22).
  • They were put in prison (v. 23).

What did Paul and Silas do while in prison (v. 25)?  They prayed and sang hymns.

What miracles occured in Philippi (vv. 18, 26)?  A demon was cast out. An earthquake shook the doors off the prison, allowing Paul and Silas to escape.

What good results came in Philippi (vv. 15, 33)?  Lydia and her household were baptized. The jailer and his family were baptized.

Why did the slave girl’s owners oppose Paul and Silas (v. 19)? They did not want to lose the income they received due to her possession.

Why were Paul and his team also opposed in Thessalonica (17:5)?  Some of the Jewish people were jealous.

Why were the Jews in Thessalonica jealous (17:4)?  because many were choosing to follow Christ through the teaching of Paul and Silas

What happened to Jason and others simply because they were associated with Paul (17:5-9)?  Their house was attacked. They were brought before the authorities.

How were Paul and his companions received in Berea (17:11,12)?  with eagerness

Who made trouble for Paul in Berea and finally drove him out of Macedonia (17:13)?  the Jews who came after him from Thessolonica

Acts 18-20 tells of Paul’s further travels back and forth through Macedonia and Greece. Notice that his traveling companions now include several Macedonians (19:29 and 20:4, note Berea and Thessalonica are part of Macedonia). Who are they?  Gaius, Aristarchus, Secundus and Sopator

Meditation

Acts 16:40 says, “After Paul and Silas came out of the prison, they went to Lydia’s house, where they met with the brothers and sisters and encouraged them.”

Acts 20:1 says that after a riot in Ephesus, Paul “sent for the disciples and, after encouraging them, said good-by and set out for Macedonia.”

How likely are you to encourage others when you are experiencing troubles of your own?

Fill in the blanks from Acts 20:23-24: “I only know that in every city the Holy Spirit warns me that prison and hardship are facing me. However, I consider my life worth nothing to me, if only I may finish the race and complete the task the Lord Jesus has given me the task of testifying to the gospel of God’s grace.”

How might working with someone who had an attitude such as this inspire the Macedonians to give sacrificially and to strive to encourage others even though they had reason to be discouraged themselves?

Fill in the blanks from 2 Corinthians 8:1-12. It says that the Macedonians, even in the most severe trial, had overflowing joy and that even in extreme poverty they were rich in generosity.

How likely are these things to be said of you?

Do you consider it a privilege to share in service to the saints as the Macedonians did, or does it seem more of a drudgery at times?

How much do you “excel in this grace of giving”?

Paul said you can “test the sincerity of your love by comparing it with the earnestness of others” (8:8). How do you compare with the earnestness we see in Paul and the Macedonians?

Think on the example of Christ we see in our text, who “though He was rich, yet for your sakes he became poor, so that you through His poverty might become rich” (8:9).

Take a moment to pray, thanking Christ for the sacrifice He made for us: leaving the majesty of heaven for the poverty of earth so that we earthly beggars might be made heirs of heavenly riches. Pray that He might help you be more like Him. Pray specifically for any convictions that came as you answered the questions in this meditation section or in the devotion.

Application

Read again the end of this month’s devotion. List here any ways you may want to “stretch yourself beyond your abilities” this month.

Dedication

What specifically do you want to do in response to this month’s devotion?

A Challenge I’m Happy to Accept

thankfull

I’ve accepted the Be Thankful Challenge from ScaleSimple. The Challenge rules are …

  • Share this image in your bog post
  • Write about 5 people in your life you are thankful for
  • Write about 5 things in 2015 that you are thankful for
  • Spread the love and challenge 5 other blogs to take part

5 People I’m Thankful for

  • My husband, Scott – Just a few of the many things about him for which I’m grateful … I love that he believes in the power of laughter and makes sure it’s a part of our lives. I appreciate his faith and strength. I’m also glad he’s easy to make up with after a disagreement. 🙂
  • My children, Mandi and Michael – I am so proud of who they have come to be as adults. They bring so much joy into my life.
  • My children’s mates, Ryan and Haley – What can I say? My kids picked good ones. They are both such loving people. (And extra thanks to Ryan for bringing little Elaina into my life!)

5(+) Things I’m Thankful for in 2015

  • God’s provision, mercy and love
  • My extended family – parents, siblings, in-laws, nieces and nephews … the whole crew. I love how much fun we have when we’re together and how we pull together during the hard times.
  •  I’m thankful for this quote from Mr. Rogers: “Always look for the helpers. Because, if you’ll look for the helpers, you’ll know that there’s hope.” This thought has brought comfort to me many times in the past few years when the chaos in the world seems almost too much to bear. It also helped me define how I wanted to address the issues in my community (see posts on Ferguson) and other crisis situations in the world.
  • So, besides being thankful for the quote above, I’m increasingly thankful for “the helpers” I see in this world and the hope they bring.
  • I’m thankful for the friends I’m tagging below for this challenge. They are my writing retreat buddies. They inspire me, challenge me, and cheer me on towards my goals.

5 Nominations for this Challenge

Encourager’s Devotional Series – November Bible Study

This Bible study corresponds with the November Devotion “Giving Out of Our Poverty” in The Encourager’s Devotional Series.

Information

Read Acts 16:1-17:15, which tells of Paul and his team’s first missionary journey to Macedonia.

From Acts 16, list the troubles that Paul and his team experienced in Philippi:

  • They were harrassed by a girl who was             by a           (vv. 16-18).
  • They were                   and                 (v. 22).
  • They were put in               (v. 23).

What did Paul and Silas do while in prison (v. 25)?

What miracles occured in Philippi (vv. 18, 26)?

What good results came in Philippi (vv. 15, 33)?

Why did the slave girl’s owners oppose Paul and Silas (v. 19)?

Why were Paul and his team also opposed in Thessalonica (17:5)?

Why were the Jews in Thessalonica jealous (17:4)?

What happened to Jason and others simply because they were associated with Paul (17:5-9)?

How were Paul and his companions received in Berea (17:11,12)?

Who made trouble for Paul in Berea and finally drove him out of Macedonia (17:13)?

Acts 18-20 tells of Paul’s further travels back and forth through Macedonia and Greece. Notice that his traveling companions now include several Macedonians (19:29 and 20:4, note Berea and Thessalonica are part of Macedonia). Who are they?

Meditation

Acts 16:40 says, “After Paul and Silas came out of the prison, they went to Lydia’s house, where they met with the brothers and sisters and                   them.”

Acts 20:1 says that after a riot in Ephesus, Paul “sent for the disciples and, after __________________ them, said good-by and set out for Macedonia.”

How likely are you to encourage others when you are experiencing troubles of your own?

Fill in the blanks from Acts 20:23-24: “I only know that in every city the Holy Spirit warns me that             and                   are facing me. However, I consider my life worth                   to me, if only I may             the           and                        the                   the Lord Jesus has given me the task of                     to the               of God’s grace.”

How might working with someone who had an attitude such as this inspire the Macedonians to give sacrificially and to strive to encourage others even though they had reason to be discouraged themselves?

Fill in the blanks from 2 Corinthians 8:1-12. It says that the Macedonians, even in the most                            , had overflowing             and that even in extreme                    they were rich in                      .

How likely are these things to be said of you?

Do you consider it a privilege to share in service to the saints as the Macedonians did, or does it seem more of a drudgery at times?

How much do you “excel in this grace of giving”?

Paul said you can “test the sincerity of your love by comparing it with the earnestness of others” (8:8). How do you compare with the earnestness we see in Paul and the Macedonians?

Think on the example of Christ we see in our text, who “though He was rich, yet for your sakes he became poor, so that you through His poverty might become rich” (8:9).

Take a moment to pray, thanking Christ for the sacrifice He made for us: leaving the majesty of heaven for the poverty of earth so that we earthly beggars might be made heirs of heavenly riches. Pray that He might help you be more like Him. Pray specifically for any convictions that came as you answered the questions in this meditation section or in the devotion.

Application

Read again the end of this month’s devotion. List here any ways you may want to “stretch yourself beyond your abilities” this month.

Dedication

What specifically do you want to do in response to this month’s devotion?

Giving Out of Our Poverty – November Encourager’s Devotion

With the Thanksgiving holiday in mind, the focus of the October devotion for The Encourager’s Devotional Series was on giving out of thankfulness for what God has given us. The main text for the devotion was 2 Corinthians 9, where Paul tells the Corinthians he’ll soon be coming for the contribution they had promised towards a collection he was taking to help the saints in Judea. In studying for that devotion, I was intrigued by the story of the church in Macedonia, which Paul was using as an example to inspire the Corinthian church to give generously to the cause.

Backing up to chapter 8, Paul describes the Macedonians as people who were in a time of great trial and affliction, and in extreme poverty. Yet, he said they had an abundance of joy. That right there would make them a model for any church, right? But Paul goes on to say that, despite their own poverty, they begged him (literally implored him with urgency) to let them contribute to the offering for the Judeans. What would cause people who were experiencing trials and poverty themselves beg to be a part of giving to someone else?

For many of us, giving to meet someone else’s need is the farthest thing from our minds when we are weighed down with our own problems. For instance, during the holidays, many people get very depressed. This time for sharing with family and giving gifts only reminds some that they’ve lost loved ones, or that they really don’t have the money to give the gifts they’d like to give, or that they really don’t get along with their families. So, instead of enjoying the season and using it as an occasion to reach out to others, they focus on the negative, turn their thoughts inward, and become sad.

The Macedonians certainly could have focused on the negative. The trial of affliction Paul mentioned was probably the persecution they were experiencing for having become Christians. Macedonia was a geographical region north of Greece which included many of the cities we hear about in Paul’s writings, like Philippi, Thessolonica, and Berea. On Paul’s first trip to Macedonia (Acts 16-18), he and Silas were thrown in jail and beaten at Philippi. Then they went to Thessolonica and a mob attacked the house where they were staying. So, they left there and went to Berea. Things were going pretty well in Berea, until some Jews from Thessolonica heard they were there and came to stir up those crowds against them, too. It got so bad that Paul had to flee to Athens. So, we are talking about a place that really had some enemies of the gospel.

And yet, Macedonia was also a place where people like Lydia, the Philippian jailer, and many others accepted the message of the gospel. These people made the decision to follow Christ knowing it would bring persecution. They knew what it meant to “count the cost” of discipleship (Luke 14:25-33). Several even decided to join Paul on his missionary journeys, despite the fact that they’d seen first-hand what kind of trouble he’d experienced. Imagine that: “Man you got beat up pretty bad today. Can I join you tomorrow?”

I think the reason these people, who had enough trouble of their own, would even think about helping others is because they knew they were a part of something much bigger than themselves. Acts 16:9,10 says that Paul had been called to Macedonia in a vision. Now, surely Paul told them about this vision. They knew they were a part of a divine call!

And, according to 2 Corinthians 8:4, they knew that divine call enlisted them into fellowship with the rest of the body of Christ. The Macedonians begged to give so they could have the “privilege of sharing in this service to the saints.” The Macedonians could have made plausible excuses for not contributing, but instead they participated eagerly.

Verse 3 says they gave out of their poverty and beyond their ability. Last month, I challenged you to give out of your abundance, out of thankfulness for the blessings you do have. Now I’d like to ask you if you can take this ministry a step further. Can you give until it hurts a little? Can you give not for the blessing or encouragement you’ll receive in return, but because of the thanks and blessing that go to the Father when you give sacrificially (2 Cor. 9:12)?

You, like the Corinthians, started this ministry commitment a year ago. Using the example of the Macedonians, as Paul did to prod the Corinthians, I pray that “your eager willingness to do it may be matched by your completion of it” (2 Cor. 8:10,11).

The Macedonians gave beyond their ability. How might you stretch yourself beyond your “abilities”? Do you need to trust God with finances? Do you need to ask His help with an inability to think compassionately or to get your focus off your own situation? Is your schedule such that you feel incapable of giving time to a worthy project? Pray and ask God what the specific application of this lesson might be for you. I pray we will all become more like the Macedonians and “beg” the Lord for opportunities to serve others in His name, regardless of the personal cost.